Pruning Roots

Pruning the roots once every 2-3 years

When pruning the roots of your potted fig trees, you must perform this once every 2-3 years. Otherwise the tree might experience a stunted growth and cause stress to the tree. It’s a good idea to prune your tree in early spring, just before the tree begins to leaf out. If you wait later in the season to prune, the tree will feel shock and the leaves will wilt for several days.

Of course, you can plan to transfer the tree into a larger pot. Although this can make it difficult to move the tree around and it can grow to enormous proportions. So, pruning is the best option if you plan to return the tree to the pot that you love so much.

Below are photographic examples showing the stages of root pruning.

 

  • This fig tree that has been removed from it’s pot. You will notice the roots that were pressed up against the lining of the pot giving the soil a distinctive shape as you can see here.
Roots ready for pruning
Roots ready for pruning

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Homemade Grow Medium

Homemade conifer grow mediums

Homemade grow medium in your pots doesn’t have to be a laborious activity, therefore this might be more enjoyable if the nutrients in the medium could last more than 2 years.

After doing some research, I came across a conifer bark-based medium mix that will last up to 3 years.

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5:1:1 mix of pine bark:humus:perlite

Mixing these ingredients together into a 5 Gal. Bucket (Pail) to mix this grow medium mixture by hand or with Playtex Gloves if your hands are sensitive.

Homemade conifer bark-based grow medium ingredients
Homemade conifer bark-based grow medium ingredients

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Harvesting Figs

Ready for harvesting your ripe figs?

Your figs have been growing for a couple of months now, it’s August or September with the sweet fig smell in the air and they’re beginning to change color, some being eaten by birds, ants or surrounded by fruit flies. You ask yourself, “Are they ripe?”. Sometimes they’re ready once they’ve reached their ideal color for your fig variety. The best time for harvesting your figs regardless of the color is when you begin to see tiny white cracks in the skin.

Harvesting a ripe fig with splitting skin
Harvesting a ripe fig with splitting skin

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Training Your Fig Tree

How To Train Your Dragon

movie poster
movie poster

Training your tree, not a dragon

Training your fig tree, not training your dragons. Here are some basic examples on fig tree shapes. There are two common forms that a fig tree can be trained into: Single trunk [D], open vase type and the multi-trunk system [C]. Northeastern fig trees can be trained to grow from a single trunk when planted in a 200-hour chilling zone. You can control the trees through pruning. A winter frost that kills most of the branches, shows when a single trunk system should be used. To maintain the single trunk, be sure to cut away new growth that may appear at the base of the tree. Use a wooden stake, if necessary, to keep the trunk growing straight. Read more

Rust spots or dead brown areas on leaves

Rust spots on your leaves

Rust beginning to form on leaf
Rust beginning to form on leaf

There are fungi that can attack your fig tree leaves. If you find large brown areas, or with a mold growing – immediately cut off the affected leaves and discard them so that the fungus will not spread throughout. Take note that there is a very dangerous common leaf mold pathogen called Rust. It mainly affects potted plants and can spread to your house plants. It will begin with small brown spots and gradually spread through the leaf. When you discover this type of infection, cut the leaf off and burn it. Read more

Solutions to protecting leaves

Solutions are available for injured fig leaves. Fig trees in this area of the Northeast don’t have many pests. Once in a while, you’ll come across leaves being eaten or discolored. Sometimes you’ll find that nothing is eating the leaves or branches most probably because the sap (latex) is sticky and can be irritating (even to human skin). Other times, the problem might not be a pest, but a rust fungi infection. Read more

Yellow, Wilted or Curling Leaves

Symptom: Yellow, wilting or curling

Yellow, wilting or curling leaves. This is a sign that your tree is dehydrated and needs water ASAP.

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Solution:

If the tree has been growing in the ground, place a garden hose directly at the base of the tree and let the water trickle over it for at least 1-2 hours. Watering a tree can be a daunting experience sometimes, so I bought this Drip Irrigation Water Rock. It might look ugly, but you can apply latex paint to it to change the color. In the meantime, it has a continuous water drip into the roots of the tree. If it’s a young freshly planted tree, continue to water it on a regular basis about once every 3 days (skipping on rainy days) until the growing season has ended.

It can also mean that there is a lack of nutrients in the soil. In this case, I recommend that you feed it some Miracle-Gro All Purpose Plant Food, 24-8-16. Follow the instructions when mixing this with water.

Official Fig Facts

Here is an official list of fig facts from Purdue University. These facts show everything from home remedies to nutritional information.

http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/fig.html

Here is a more human version of the nutritional information:

http://caloriecount.about.com/calories-figs-dried-uncooked-i9094?size=2

Here’s another good resource on Fig Facts. It’s an Australian site with info about how figs are grown in California. I found it to be particularly informative.

http://www.foodforest.com.au/fact-sheets/fruit-and-nut-trees/figs/

Rooting Materials

Rooting starter kit

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Rooting Materials
These are materials used for rooting your clippings

Rooting for the first time while propagating fig trees from clippings, then here are materials that you will need. Read more