Blog Income For Wealth

Blog income is easy peasy

If you’re not blogging, then start now! Did you know that there are bloggers making over $1 million annually or over $400,000 on a single post? That’s really nuts. And if you have a blog and not earning money through affiliate marketing, then you’re losing money left and right. Writing in a blog doesn’t require of much education other than the ability to communicate, use a computer and have a hobby that you want to tell everyone about. I’m not saying you need to have technical skills, just know how to use a keyboard.

Ready! Get Set! Go!

So, do you want to know how to start a blog? Then I will show you how with this instruction. Years ago when I was making my fig website, I didn’t actually know how to build a blog, so I took the easy route Read more

Spring cleaning at Figgi Riggi

Spring Cleanup: A good time to tidy things up a bit

This late Spring, you may have noticed a bit of silence from my posts lately. That’s because I’ve been working away in the invisible background cleaning up affiliate site links and improving some of the old pages with more interesting content. I was making improvements to the site title image at the top of the page. After I created it, I noticed that the 4 dots look like little figs.

I created a Facebook page and made graphics for that too. Here’s one of those images.

An image made for the Facebook page.

 

 

 

 

 

At some point, I intend to edit all of the images on the site with interesting title watermarks like this Ants photo seen here.

Garden Ants
Garden Ants with interesting watermark.

Education and our curiosity to learn

Meanwhile, I am focusing on what my next major topic will become. One that will be educational to my curious readers. I was once a college instructor, so I do like to educate. With that in mind, I’d like to create an introductory tutorial on using a free open-source application called InkScape. It’s available for Linux, Windows and Apple OS’s. This will take time to create, so bare with me on this plan. This will be a side project while I write other interesting topics.

Money that makes the world go ’round

I’d also like to share some tidbits about income that I plan to receive from internet-related side jobs. It’s an interesting topic and one that my readers can utilize if they too want to gain some extra cash. So, this week I’ll create a budget and share my gains. Besides, every blog is rooted in money at some point.

Things that might get in the way of some progress this week is: a friend who’s struggling with cancer who I intend to visit sometime soon. I’ve also decided to get back in shape at the gym. The gym helps to keep my eyes healthy by being a healthy distraction from the computer screens.

Peeper

I will make short term goals and while using a sense of transparency, I’ll post them in here. Why would I do such a thing? Well, isn’t everyone a bit of a “peeping Tom” by instinct? If not, then I guess you’ll become one while following my blog posts. 🙂

USDA Gardening Zones

Which USDA gardening zone am I in?

The USDA has set up an essential guide for gardeners which helps them determine if their plants or fruit trees will grow in their climate. This helps a gardener choose whether they want to go through the trouble of planting a rare plant species in their region, whether outdoors, in a pot or a greenhouse. There are many fig tree varieties and some grow better in certain areas than others. The USDA zones range from 1a-13b and in the Northeast USA, you will find a range from 3b-7b. Fig trees in general can grow very easily without much care in zones 5 and above. This resource at plantlust.com indicates that Brown Turkey fig trees grow best in zones from 6a-9b.

This blog features steps on how to grow a Brown Turkey fig tree in zone 7a. It is recommended that anyone living in 4 and lower should grow their fig trees in pots or in a greenhouse and be protected from Winter temperatures that dip below 20 degrees F.

Determine which zone you live in

Here is a Zone Map

USDA half zones complete with a legend
USDA half zones complete with a legend

 

New Jersey, where I grow fig trees in zone 7a
New Jersey, where I grow fig trees in zone 7a
Connecticut USDA Zone Map
Connecticut, where I frequently tend to a fig tree in zone 7a.