Pests are Eating My Figs

Figs are a popular sweet treat in nature for both humans and the sneakiest pestspests

 

Figs are attacked by all sorts of pests and they do it ferociously as if the end of the world has come. They can drain the juices from the figs within a day or two. Although there is one thing that I noticed when hurricanes come to the region. The day afterward, the flies come. I don’t understand it, but the fruit begins to rot very quickly and this attracts the flies. Here are examples of the most common creatures that I’ve personally come across through observation.

Woodpeckers

Are probably the most damaging pests of all. They’ll just sit there pecking away, leaving holes in the figs. I’m not sure if they’re pecking at the insects or simply have a “sweet tooth”. I believe it’s the latter. If you have a woodpecker problem, I suggest you either run outside as fast as possible to get the ripe figs before the birds do, stand on guard with a BB gun, or simply surround your tree with a bird net. My choice would be the net.

White faced hornet

Sometimes known as the bald faced hornet. Workers arrive to eat the pulp inside the fig. They’ll stand their ground, so if you see a ripe fig next to their fig, it’s best to leave it alone until they leave. These hornets are peaceful creatures if you leave them alone. They’ll know you’re there if you’re watching them, but they won’t attack you like a wasp might. All they want to do is eat. If you disturb them, they’ll come and attack you with their nasty stinger leaving a most painful injection of venom.

Fig Wasps

These insects are not necessarily regarded as a pests, although their actions may cause the fig to ripen very quickly and the fig will lose its appeal. Before you know it, the fig will have dropped to the ground ready to germinate. Some figs require such a creature to pollinate the flowers deep inside.

Fruit flies

Fruit flies just appear out of nowhere and are always around. House flies seem to appear after a rain storm when some of the figs quickly begin to rot. Hurricanes are known to quickly rot your figs nearly overnight. The next day, the figs will be covered in fly pests. Occasionally, you might find a male mosquito drinking the nectar, while they pierce the skin of the fig. I’m not particularly excited about the fact that I’m feeding mosquitoes.

Some people claim that squirrels and raccoons are the pests, but I have yet to see them actually attack the fig trees.

If you see a spiderweb on your tree, keep it there. You’ll be thankful that such a predator has found the perfect place to hang their trap. Ladybugs are also helpful to help control the pests.