Cancer-free weed killer

Spring has sprung and along came the heavy rain showers. You’ve recovered from cancer and go for a walk through your yard to see all the beautiful plants flourishing, then you spot your least favorite plants…

WEEDS!!!

No, not marijuana unless you were intending to grow it.

Weeds are everywhere thanks to the wonderful rain. Some people like to leave them alone, but others are ready to do anything they can to get rid of them. You can dig them up or use RoundUp, but why risk your health?

  • This page contains affiliate links to products I recommend. If you purchase something from this page, I may receive a small payment from the sale to help support the cost of running this site at no additional cost to you.

Cancer-free weed killer is the right choice.

Here’s how you can make your own and it’s quite simple.

Mix all of these safe ingredients together inside the pump sprayer and be sure that the salt completely dissolves. On a calm day without wind, pump the solution and spray it on the leaves of the weeds. This should only be done on a warm sunny day without rain in the forecast for at least 2-3 days. Within 24 hrs you should see immediate results. A second application might be needed if you have very big weeds. I used this on dandelion weeds and poison ivy revealing incredible effectiveness. If you perform this on a windy day, the spray might land on your favorite plants Read more

Rust spots or dead brown areas on leaves

Rust spots on your leaves

Rust beginning to form on leaf
Rust beginning to form on leaf

There are fungi that can attack your fig tree leaves. If you find large brown areas, or with a mold growing – immediately cut off the affected leaves and discard them so that the fungus will not spread throughout. Take note that there is a very dangerous common leaf mold pathogen called Rust. It mainly affects potted plants and can spread to your house plants. It will begin with small brown spots and gradually spread through the leaf. When you discover this type of infection, cut the leaf off and burn it. Read more

Solutions to protecting leaves

Solutions are available for injured fig leaves. Fig trees in this area of the Northeast don’t have many pests. Once in a while, you’ll come across leaves being eaten or discolored. Sometimes you’ll find that nothing is eating the leaves or branches most probably because the sap (latex) is sticky and can be irritating (even to human skin). Other times, the problem might not be a pest, but a rust fungi infection. Read more

Yellow, Wilted or Curling Leaves

Symptom: Yellow, wilting or curling

Yellow, wilting or curling leaves. This is a sign that your tree is dehydrated and needs water ASAP.

  • This page contains affiliate links to products I recommend. If you purchase something from this page, I may receive a small payment from the sale to help support the cost of running this site at no additional cost to you.

Solution:

If the tree has been growing in the ground, place a garden hose directly at the base of the tree and let the water trickle over it for at least 1-2 hours. Watering a tree can be a daunting experience sometimes, so I bought this Drip Irrigation Water Rock. It might look ugly, but you can apply latex paint to it to change the color. In the meantime, it has a continuous water drip into the roots of the tree. If it’s a young freshly planted tree, continue to water it on a regular basis about once every 3 days (skipping on rainy days) until the growing season has ended.

It can also mean that there is a lack of nutrients in the soil. In this case, I recommend that you feed it some Miracle-Gro All Purpose Plant Food, 24-8-16. Follow the instructions when mixing this with water.