Which USDA gardening zone am I in? The USDA has set up an essential guide for gardeners which helps them determine if their plants or fruit trees will grow in their climate. This helps a gardener choose whether they want to go through the trouble of planting a rare plant species in their region, whether […]

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Pruning the roots once every 2-3 years When pruning the roots of your potted fig trees, you must perform this once every 2-3 years. Otherwise the tree might experience a stunted growth and cause stress to the tree. It’s a good idea to prune your tree in early spring, just before the tree begins to leaf out. […]

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Homemade conifer grow mediums Homemade grow medium in your pots doesn’t have to be a laborious activity, therefore this might be more enjoyable if the nutrients in the medium could last more than 2 years. After doing some research, I came across a conifer bark-based medium mix that will last up to 3 years. This page contains […]

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Ready for harvesting your ripe figs? Your figs have been growing for a couple of months now, it’s August or September with the sweet fig smell in the air and they’re beginning to change color, some being eaten by birds, ants or surrounded by fruit flies. You ask yourself, “Are they ripe?”. Sometimes they’re ready […]

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How To Train Your Dragon Training your tree, not a dragon Training your fig tree, not training your dragons. Here are some basic examples on fig tree shapes. There are two common forms that a fig tree can be trained into: Single trunk [D], open vase type and the multi-trunk system [C]. Northeastern fig trees can be […]

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Rust spots on your leaves There are fungi that can attack your fig tree leaves. If you find large brown areas, or with a mold growing – immediately cut off the affected leaves and discard them so that the fungus will not spread throughout. Take note that there is a very dangerous common leaf mold […]

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Solutions are available for injured fig leaves. Fig trees in this area of the Northeast don’t have many pests. Once in a while, you’ll come across leaves being eaten or discolored. Sometimes you’ll find that nothing is eating the leaves or branches most probably because the sap (latex) is sticky and can be irritating (even […]

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Symptom: Yellow, wilting or curling Yellow, wilting or curling leaves. This is a sign that your tree is dehydrated and needs water ASAP. Solution: If the tree has been growing in the ground, place a garden hose directly at the base of the tree and let the water trickle over it for at least 1-2 […]

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Here is an official list of fig facts from Purdue University. These facts show everything from home remedies to nutritional information. http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/fig.html Here is a more human version of the nutritional information: http://caloriecount.about.com/calories-figs-dried-uncooked-i9094?size=2 Here’s another good resource on Fig Facts. It’s an Australian site with info about how figs are grown in California. I found […]

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Chances are that birds have found your figs to be mighty delicious!   mmmm, they’ve got a sweet tooth There are two possible solutions you can try. (these solutions are not a guarantee for success) Race outside and pick the figs before the birds get to them. Cover or surround your tree with a net. […]

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