Master Gardener Studies

gardener dying tree

 

I have had an interest as a gardener and enjoying the delicious nature of figs ever since my childhood after years of visiting my grandparents in south Alabama. There, they had the most memorable sweet Brown Turkey fig trees. Since then, I’ve always had an interest in propagating them in the New Jersey where the climate can be harsh on them. After giving them away to friends, I created this information blog so that any questions they might have would be answered here. After 18 years, my mother decided that I’ve finally become an expert with the knowledge that I’ve developed even though I don’t see my self as a master yet. She had an idea that I should apply for the local Rutgers Cooperative Extension Master Gardener certification course. Read more

Potted Fig Trees

Potted Fig Tree
Potted Fig Tree

General Care For Potted Fig Trees

Potted fig trees need certain requirements in order to grow successfully. Consider the following tips.

Pot Type

Choose a pot with a manageable size with holes on the bottom. The one I provide is a nursery pot, which means it’s the black flimsy kind that has large holes on the bottom (the kind that comes with a new bush from the plant store) and it doesn’t allow much root growth. Include a tray to fit under your pot to collect excess water. Buy my favorite nursery pots. I’ve had the best success with these. Read more

General Care

General Care for your fig tree

General Care: How to know if your environment is suitable for growing a fig tree? Before you decide, check to see if you can get a minimum of 6 hrs sunlight for your tree. Once you’ve confirmed this, get a fig tree! Although it’s not so simple. Find out which USDA zone you are in and then determine which variety will grow in your climate.

There are times when you just want to simply know how to take care of your fig tree. Your tree is either grown from a pot or outside.

How you grow it depends on your climate. If you live in an environment where the temperatures reach extreme cold conditions in the Winter season such as in New Hampshire, upper portions of upstate New York or even in Canada. In this case, you should consider growing your tree in a pot. Growing it in a pot means that you take it indoors to a cool dark room during the cold Winter months while the tree sits dormant like a grizzly bear sleeping in its den. For warmer climates such as in New Jersey, Connecticut, Pennsylvania or Maryland you can certainly transplant your tree out in your yard. For further instructions, look under Potted Fig Trees and Outside Living. Read more