Pruning Roots

Pruning the roots once every 2-3 years

When pruning the roots of your potted fig trees, you must perform this once every 2-3 years. Otherwise the tree might experience a stunted growth and cause stress to the tree. It’s a good idea to prune your tree in early spring, just before the tree begins to leaf out. If you wait later in the season to prune, the tree will feel shock and the leaves will wilt for several days.

Of course, you can plan to transfer the tree into a larger pot. Although this can make it difficult to move the tree around and it can grow to enormous proportions. So, pruning is the best option if you plan to return the tree to the pot that you love so much.

Below are photographic examples showing the stages of root pruning.

 

  • This fig tree that has been removed from it’s pot. You will notice the roots that were pressed up against the lining of the pot giving the soil a distinctive shape as you can see here.
Roots ready for pruning
Roots ready for pruning

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Homemade Grow Medium

Homemade conifer grow mediums

Homemade grow medium in your pots doesn’t have to be a laborious activity, therefore this might be more enjoyable if the nutrients in the medium could last more than 2 years.

After doing some research, I came across a conifer bark-based medium mix that will last up to 3 years.

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5:1:1 mix of pine bark:humus:perlite

Mixing these ingredients together into a 5 Gal. Bucket (Pail) to mix this grow medium mixture by hand or with Playtex Gloves if your hands are sensitive.

Homemade conifer bark-based grow medium ingredients
Homemade conifer bark-based grow medium ingredients

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Rooting Materials

Rooting starter kit

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Rooting Materials
These are materials used for rooting your clippings

Rooting for the first time while propagating fig trees from clippings, then here are materials that you will need. Read more

Rooting From Summer Cuttings

Rooting from summer cuttings is very simple with this instruction

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Rooting Fig Tree Success
This fig tree was successfully grown from a summer cutting.

Rooting with this method has close similarities to rooting from winter cuttings. It’s essentially the same, however it requires complex tools found in the Rooting Materials post. Materials required are in the root starter kit as mentioned in the page. (Humidity Dome, Plug Tray, Growing Tray, Rooting Hormone and Seeding Heat Mat, sold separately).

Follow these 7 easy steps

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Rooting From Winter Cuttings

preparing the cutting

Rooting from winter cuttings made easy

Everyone seems to have their own favorite method of rooting, especially when rooting from Winter cuttings. The steps below describe one method that some people like because they can stick the cuttings into the grow medium and then set it aside until the cutting leafs out. Other people like to add another step that they think is more reliable. That other step is to first collect a few 6-8 inch cuttings, bunch them together and wrap a damp paper towel around them. Insert them into a ziploc bag, seal it and then set it outside under the shade. Once the roots form, insert each cutting into it’s own pot with grow medium. This method leaves out the need to use rooting hormone. Read more

Air Layering a Fig Tree Root

Air layering

15 Steps to Air layering a tree to form roots

Maybe you’re wondering what Air Layering is. When I first heard the words, I pictured wafer cookies with layers of air in them. Air Layering your fig tree is not too far from that concept.

As you know, I love sweet figs and ever since I was a kid, I loved picking the figs off the trees at my grandma’s house in Loxely, AL. It wasn’t until just 17 years ago when I planted a fig tree in New Jersey, USA and once again enjoyed the sweet taste of freshly grown figs. One day, I had a natural desire to propagate additional trees through a method that my granddaddy used to utilize called Air Layering. His green thumb genes were apparently naturally releasing from within me. Read more