Rust spots or dead brown areas on leaves

Rust spots on your leaves

Rust beginning to form on leaf
Rust beginning to form on leaf

There are fungi that can attack your fig tree leaves. If you find large brown areas, or with a mold growing – immediately cut off the affected leaves and discard them so that the fungus will not spread throughout. Take note that there is a very dangerous common leaf mold pathogen called Rust. It mainly affects potted plants and can spread to your house plants. It will begin with small brown spots and gradually spread through the leaf. When you discover this type of infection, cut the leaf off and burn it. Read more

Rooting Materials

Rooting starter kit

Rooting Materials
These are materials used for rooting your clippings

Rooting for the first time while propagating fig trees from clippings, then here are materials that you will need. Read more

Rooting From Summer Cuttings

Rooting from summer cuttings is very simple with this instruction

Rooting Fig Tree Success
This fig tree was successfully grown from a summer cutting.

Rooting with this method has close similarities to rooting from winter cuttings. It’s essentially the same, however it requires complex tools found in the Rooting Materials post. Materials required are in the root starter kit as mentioned in the page. (Humidity Dome, Plug Tray, Growing Tray, Rooting Hormone and Seeding Heat Mat, sold separately).

Follow these 7 easy steps

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Rooting From Winter Cuttings

preparing the cutting

Rooting from winter cuttings made easy

Everyone seems to have their own favorite method of rooting, especially when rooting from Winter cuttings. The steps below describe one method that some people like because they can stick the cuttings into the grow medium and then set it aside until the cutting leafs out. Other people like to add another step that they think is more reliable. That other step is to first collect a few 6-8 inch cuttings, bunch them together and wrap a damp paper towel around them. Insert them into a ziploc bag, seal it and then set it outside under the shade. Once the roots form, insert each cutting into it’s own pot with grow medium. This method leaves out the need to use rooting hormone. Read more

Transplanting

The Thing with Two Heads

movie poster
movie poster

No, this isn’t the art of making a two-headed freak as in the movie classic, The Incredible Two-Headed Transplant / The Thing with Two Heads (Midnite Movies Double Feature). This is about transplanting the fig tree from a pot into the ground. Read more

Potted Fig Trees

Potted Fig Tree
Potted Fig Tree

General Care For Potted Fig Trees

Potted fig trees need certain requirements in order to grow successfully. Consider the following tips.

Pot Type

Choose a pot with a manageable size with holes on the bottom. The one I provide is a nursery pot, which means it’s the black flimsy kind that has large holes on the bottom (the kind that comes with a new bush from the plant store) and it doesn’t allow much root growth. Include a tray to fit under your pot to collect excess water. Buy my favorite nursery pots. I’ve had the best success with these. Read more

General Care

General Care for your fig tree

General Care: How to know if your environment is suitable for growing a fig tree? Before you decide, check to see if you can get a minimum of 6 hrs sunlight for your tree. Once you’ve confirmed this, get a fig tree! Although it’s not so simple. Find out which USDA zone you are in and then determine which variety will grow in your climate.

There are times when you just want to simply know how to take care of your fig tree. Your tree is either grown from a pot or outside.

How you grow it depends on your climate. If you live in an environment where the temperatures reach extreme cold conditions in the Winter season such as in New Hampshire, upper portions of upstate New York or even in Canada. In this case, you should consider growing your tree in a pot. Growing it in a pot means that you take it indoors to a cool dark room during the cold Winter months while the tree sits dormant like a grizzly bear sleeping in its den. For warmer climates such as in New Jersey, Connecticut, Pennsylvania or Maryland you can certainly transplant your tree out in your yard. For further instructions, look under Potted Fig Trees and Outside Living. Read more